Tag Archives: Honors

Four Years

Four Years spent at Hofstra University, diligently working though classes, living out my college experience with friends, clubs/activities and the required horrible food. (okay Lackman wasn’t that bad, but it was pretty expensive) I started my last semester with the intention of making it my best, and getting the most out of the time I had left. I also intended to blog more, and we all know how well that turned out…

But I took 15 credits, including a thesis project for one last honors college requirement, and a journalism class to see how the “other side” wrote. Even though I was the only senior in the class, it was still a rewarding experience. I have a flair for journalism and I kind of regret not taking more classes. My GPA this semester is the highest I’ve ever gotten, with 3 A’s and two A- ‘s.

Undergraduate Course work

Subject Course Course Title Final Grade Attempted Earned

GPA Hours

Quality Points

CRWR 190I ART OF REVISION A-

3.000

3.000

3.000

11.10

CRWR 199 HONORS PROJECT A-

3.000

3.000

3.000

11.10

ENGL 292F QUEER VICTORIANS A

3.000

3.000

3.000

12.00

GERM 104 ADV GERMAN LANGUAGE A

3.000

3.000

3.000

12.00

JRNL 011 NEWS WRITING AND REPORTING A

3.000

3.000

3.000

12.00

Undergraduate Summary

Attempted Earned GPA Hours Quality Points GPA
Current Term:

15.000

15.000

15.000

58.20

3.88

Cumulative:

111.000

111.000

111.000

408.30

3.67

Transfer:

15.000

15.000

0.000

0.00

0.00

Overall:

126.000

126.000

111.000

408.30

3.67

Outside of the classroom, I strove to live my life to the fullest. I worked part time, assembling a book of world records. I also worked to get a discussion group started for gay and spiritual topics  and restarted the honors college blog (huhc.wordpress.com) I also got closer to friends I had met the semester before, close enough that saying good bye was not fun. I’m glad we can stay in touch thanks to the internet… 

It turned out I saved the best for last as this was easily my best semester ever. I’m sad school is over; I really did love it. 

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Honors College Chocolate Tasting

Covered it last Friday for an JRNL 11H article.

Chocolate lovers flocked to the second floor of the library on Friday where the Honors College hosted a bigger and better event for its 6th Annual Chocolate Tasting. This was the first year the tasting was held in the Honors College’s new location and part of the University’s “Sweet Valentine” event series.

The staff of Honors College greeted attendees with an elaborate spread of chocolate products, as well as extensive information on how to enjoy chocolate with all five senses, just like wine. The tables were set up with the darkest chocolate – up to a 100 percent Cacao – at either end while the sweeter chocolate was in the middle along with high quality truffles.

Familiar brands like Ghirardelli and Lindt filled the table but with exotic flavors, such as chocolates with chili or a touch of sea salt. There was chocolate from Trader Joe’s placed in-between the intense dark chocolate and the truffles and artisan chocolate in the middle.

Long lines quickly formed at either end of the tables. Everyone was encouraged to cleanse their palate with water or crackers in order to fully enjoy  the chocolate. Friends brought each other water so they wouldn’t lose their place in line.

The staff also encouraged the budding chocolate connoisseurs to try the 100 or 99 percent cacao. However most who sampled the darkest chocolate echoed the sentiments of HUHC senior Stephen Puliafico when he declared “anything above 75 percent tastes like dirt.”

Love was on the mind of at least a few of the samplers. When a student commented that the darker chocolate could be used as an aphrodisiac or love potion, Associate Dean Neil Donahue laughed. “Love Potion? We’re not responsible for consequences!”

This year’s Chocolate Tasting was better advertised and attended than in previous years where it was an Honors College exclusive event held in the basement of East Library Wing. But Dean Warren Frisina promised the tradition still would be “even bigger next year.”

Leave a comment

Filed under Assignments

U-Bahn

When you look at this map, it looks daunting right? When we first came to Munich, several of my friends confessed to feeling intimidated by the subway system. I was not, as I was already accustomed to using subways back in Boston, and to a lesser extent, New York and DC.

However I don’t blame them. This map shows both the Subway (The U-Bahn) and the S-Bahn. It’s hard to find an exact translation/equivalent to the S-Bahn but the closest would be the Commuter Rail in Boston, or the Long Island Rail Road, if both systems went through the city and proceed to go out the other side. That’s what long thick strip in the middle of the map is – nearly all the S-Bahn lines.

Getting around is relatively easy, especially with a monthly pass. I had an id for the system that let me get reduced price on the passes. And I used the system nearly every day as the dorms were on one line and JYM’s office were on another. My commute took about 40 minutes, give or take, which is what I had during High School. But I’m not sure if I covered the same amount of ground in Munich as I did in Boston.  From Studentenstadt, where all the students live, I had to go down to Seldinger Tor and Transfer to the U2 and take it just two stops to Koinigsplatz. Or it’s about a 15 minute walk from Odeonsplatz which is on the U6. I never did figure out which way was quicker as I only walked a few times.  I suppose the only difficulty was going back from Koinigsplatz to say Marienplatz. It was only three stops, but it was a bit awkward because of the transfer. If it was just to get something to eat at Viktualienmarkt or something like that, then I found it easier to walk to Hauptbahnhof and take the S-Bahn instead of dealing with the transfer. I could have also just taken the U2 to Seldinger Tor and walked as it was really close to Marienplatz.

1 Comment

Filed under Travels

Munich Philharmonic

Better Late than never.

One of my favorite memories in Munich was going to see The Munich Philharmonic. It was the “Uni-Night” meaning students got in for 10 Euros, but I got to go for free because I went with my culture class. One of the assignments we had in that class was to attend four different cultural events and write a report about them. I chose a movie, a reading, a festival held at our dorms, and the Philharmonic.

I have been fortunate enough to attend a few classical concerts back in the States, but the atmosphere around the Gasteig, where the Philharmonic play, was different. Even though it was student night, most if not all the guests milling about, waiting for the house to open, were at least dressed up a little bit. I was glad I decided to change into my khakis, but even then I felt slightly under dressed.  I’m sure it was possible to see the Philharmonic if you weren’t dressed up, because it was student night, but it looked like a lot of the students had decided to anyways. Back in the states, I remember seeing concerts on field trips and the whole hall filled with others who were obviously students, all dressed in jeans or something else casual. But in Munich, it was harder to pick out the student verses the regular Orchestra goers.

I was really glad I got to go because it was such a rewarding experience. The Hall itself was very impressive and modern (one of those designed for the best acoustics) while the music was interesting.

I fell in love with Frank Zappa’s Bogus Pomp. It was my first time hearing it and it was so… it’s almost indescribable because Zappa was a primarily rock composer and musician, who carried his style over to the orchestra. They used plastic as instruments (no lie) for a brief part of the piece. They also stamped and shouted occasionally as well. It was all in sync and awesome. Bizarre and awesome and the same time.

http://www.mphil.de/en/education/university-concert/

2 Comments

Filed under Travels

Honors Blog

I have an opportunity to earn Honors credit while I’m in Germany, if I maintain a Study-Abroad Journal. Now I have an incentive to blog!

Here is the assignment page.

1. Everyday Life (Required): Describe your living situation and routine, and note 5-10 specific differences in everyday life practice between your experience there and the U.S., whether at home or at university. Elaborate where possible. This section is required and prerequisite to the others: students should make a dated entry at the beginning of their stay and again at the end, upon arriving and upon departing, and throughout the stay.

3.31.10

31.3.10 <– It’s how Europeans write the date.

  • Food/Eating

Generally, German refrigerators are a lot smaller than their American counterparts. It’s nearly impossible to buy a whole week’s worth of food like American families typically do. So Germans will go to the food market multiple times a week. The benefit is they can always buy fresh ingredients. German supermarkets themselves are smaller than the ones in the US. There are more of them spread around the area so, 9 times out of 10, it’s easy to get to one on foot. In my case, there’s two markets just a half kilometer from where we live.

Also until recently, Germans treated their lunch as their biggest meal of the day, while dinner was more like a packed lunch: bread and meats or cheeses. They call it “Brotzeit” which literally means bread time, but is translated as brownbag lunch.

  • Beer

Germans have the right attitude about alcohol. It’s not a taboo like it is in America. Kids grow up knowing what it tastes like because their parents let them try it at the dinner table. It’s possible for an adult to order their teen beer at a restaurant and not get in trouble, which isn’t the case back home. Even though I’ve only been here a short while, I haven’t seen anyone get “carded” like they do in the States.

  • Getting Around

I have never been in a more bike friendly city. There are devoted bike paths all over the city and at least 90% of them are right on the sidewalks so bikers don’t have to worry about drivers. If they are on the street, then the street is wide enough to allow for a bike lane by the edge of the street. People will put baskets on their bikes and bike to the store. Child seats or wagons are also common.

Germans also love to walk. If they’re not on a bike, odds are they’re on foot.

The Subway (Untergrundbahn or U-Bahn) here is really efficient, and clean. Most stations have display boards for when the next trains are coming. Something that I’ve never seen before is the doors will not open on their own. You have to pull the lever (or push the button on the newer trains) in order for them to open. It comes in handy during slower times and at slower stations. If not a lot of doors open, then the operator generally can leave the station quicker than if all the doors automatically opened.

  • Campus/College

There isn’t really a campus here in Munich. While there are University buildings all clustered together like in a typical urban campus, there aren’t any dorms nearby. Instead there are apartment buildings and dorms together in a Student City (Studentstadt) a few stops away on the U-Bahn. It’s also pretty hard to find any clubs like there are back at Hofstra. There might be some student groups that meet in the Studentstadt, but there aren’t as many nor are they University sponsored.

Leave a comment

Filed under Travels